Struct serde::lib::core::os::unix::net::UnixListener

1.10.0 · source · []
pub struct UnixListener(Socket);
This is supported on Unix only.
Expand description

A structure representing a Unix domain socket server.

Examples

use std::thread;
use std::os::unix::net::{UnixStream, UnixListener};

fn handle_client(stream: UnixStream) {
    // ...
}

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener = UnixListener::bind("/path/to/the/socket")?;

    // accept connections and process them, spawning a new thread for each one
    for stream in listener.incoming() {
        match stream {
            Ok(stream) => {
                /* connection succeeded */
                thread::spawn(|| handle_client(stream));
            }
            Err(err) => {
                /* connection failed */
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    Ok(())
}

Tuple Fields

0: Socket

Implementations

Creates a new UnixListener bound to the specified socket.

Examples
use std::os::unix::net::UnixListener;

let listener = match UnixListener::bind("/path/to/the/socket") {
    Ok(sock) => sock,
    Err(e) => {
        println!("Couldn't connect: {e:?}");
        return
    }
};
🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (unix_socket_abstract)

Creates a new UnixListener bound to the specified socket address.

Examples
#![feature(unix_socket_abstract)]
use std::os::unix::net::{UnixListener};

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener1 = UnixListener::bind("path/to/socket")?;
    let addr = listener1.local_addr()?;

    let listener2 = match UnixListener::bind_addr(&addr) {
        Ok(sock) => sock,
        Err(err) => {
            println!("Couldn't bind: {err:?}");
            return Err(err);
        }
    };
    Ok(())
}

Accepts a new incoming connection to this listener.

This function will block the calling thread until a new Unix connection is established. When established, the corresponding UnixStream and the remote peer’s address will be returned.

Examples
use std::os::unix::net::UnixListener;

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener = UnixListener::bind("/path/to/the/socket")?;

    match listener.accept() {
        Ok((socket, addr)) => println!("Got a client: {addr:?}"),
        Err(e) => println!("accept function failed: {e:?}"),
    }
    Ok(())
}

Creates a new independently owned handle to the underlying socket.

The returned UnixListener is a reference to the same socket that this object references. Both handles can be used to accept incoming connections and options set on one listener will affect the other.

Examples
use std::os::unix::net::UnixListener;

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener = UnixListener::bind("/path/to/the/socket")?;
    let listener_copy = listener.try_clone().expect("try_clone failed");
    Ok(())
}

Returns the local socket address of this listener.

Examples
use std::os::unix::net::UnixListener;

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener = UnixListener::bind("/path/to/the/socket")?;
    let addr = listener.local_addr().expect("Couldn't get local address");
    Ok(())
}

Moves the socket into or out of nonblocking mode.

This will result in the accept operation becoming nonblocking, i.e., immediately returning from their calls. If the IO operation is successful, Ok is returned and no further action is required. If the IO operation could not be completed and needs to be retried, an error with kind io::ErrorKind::WouldBlock is returned.

Examples
use std::os::unix::net::UnixListener;

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener = UnixListener::bind("/path/to/the/socket")?;
    listener.set_nonblocking(true).expect("Couldn't set non blocking");
    Ok(())
}

Returns the value of the SO_ERROR option.

Examples
use std::os::unix::net::UnixListener;

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener = UnixListener::bind("/tmp/sock")?;

    if let Ok(Some(err)) = listener.take_error() {
        println!("Got error: {err:?}");
    }
    Ok(())
}
Platform specific

On Redox this always returns None.

Returns an iterator over incoming connections.

The iterator will never return None and will also not yield the peer’s SocketAddr structure.

Examples
use std::thread;
use std::os::unix::net::{UnixStream, UnixListener};

fn handle_client(stream: UnixStream) {
    // ...
}

fn main() -> std::io::Result<()> {
    let listener = UnixListener::bind("/path/to/the/socket")?;

    for stream in listener.incoming() {
        match stream {
            Ok(stream) => {
                thread::spawn(|| handle_client(stream));
            }
            Err(err) => {
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    Ok(())
}

Trait Implementations

🔬 This is a nightly-only experimental API. (io_safety)

Borrows the file descriptor. Read more

Extracts the raw file descriptor. Read more

Formats the value using the given formatter. Read more

Converts to this type from the input type.

Converts to this type from the input type.

Constructs a new instance of Self from the given raw file descriptor. Read more

The type of the elements being iterated over.

Which kind of iterator are we turning this into?

Creates an iterator from a value. Read more

Consumes this object, returning the raw underlying file descriptor. Read more

Auto Trait Implementations

Blanket Implementations

Gets the TypeId of self. Read more

Immutably borrows from an owned value. Read more

Mutably borrows from an owned value. Read more

Returns the argument unchanged.

Calls U::from(self).

That is, this conversion is whatever the implementation of From<T> for U chooses to do.

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

Performs the conversion.

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

Performs the conversion.